I’m Thankful For WordPress

There’s a lot of things I’m thankful for: my family, my dog, a freelancer’s freedom, Christ. But as it pertains to my livelihood I’m particularly thankful for WordPress.

Not only was WordPress my kick-start into standards-based web design, but it has since served as my primary CMS of choice. I don’t need to go into features that make WordPress great. They are and if you don’t believe me I can prove it to you elsewhere.

The WordPress feature-set is nice, but I’m most thankful for everything surrounding WordPress. Community: IRC, forums, thousands of WP-centered blogs with great info, WordCamps, passion.

I’d like to touch on that last note: passion. I’ve seen some passionate people around the WordPress-o-sphere for a while, but I’ve recently just really noticed it. I’ve always felt passionate about WordPress, but of course the fire grows.

Any sort of product, service, company, etc. with a following there will have turmoil at some point. WordPress licensing debates have gone on forever, but within the past year they’ve really blown up. The same sort of fiery issues come up every once in a while (i.e. commercial plugins, duplicating premium themes, wp.org progress, MU, etc.). Those on both sides of an issue dig their trenches and seemingly burrow deeper and deeper as the argument continues.

Of course fighting for your stance tooth and nail isn’t anything new. But what amazes me is that WordPress can cause it. For starters, WordPress is six years old. In part, its infancy is probably a cause of some of the issues. Nevertheless, it hasn’t be around long and already there are enough users divided amongst themselves. It’s not a good thing, but it is cool to see so many people making their cases because they care.

No one would waste their time arguing about WordPress if they didn’t care — almost no one, that is. Sure, there’s some people that argue because they just like to disagree with people. Others do so selfishly and care not what is best for WordPress but for themselves. For the most part, though, people want to see WordPress succeed (beyond what it’s incredibly achieved so far).

So we argue debate because we care.

Sometimes we just need a reminder of what we’re thankful for. Keep that in mind if you’re amongst those of us who spend time (too much?) trying to figure out where WordPress is, where it should go and how to get there.

Happy Thanksgiving.

4 Comments

  1. I too very much like WordPress. It seems like there are new plug-ins all the time and some really amazing themes. I was recently looking for away to sell pet clothes online by combining my blog and a store. I didn’t think there was anything out there like that and then I discovered the Market Theme.

    It adds a store front to my blog so i can see products without sacrificing the blog. It has a nice shopping cart that hooks up to Paypal very smoothly. Amazing.

    Who knows, maybe soon we’ll be taking virtual vacations via our worpress sites using holographic images and 3D virtual modeling.

    Reply

  2. After banging my head up against the Expression Engine brick wall for years, I finally broke through and now see the WordPress light.

    I too am thankful for WordPress. I am also thankful for Hybrid framework.

    Reply

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