MyBlogLog, You Could Be So Much More!

Here’s my MyBlogLog account (awfully redundant…oh well). For those of you unfamiliar with MyBlogLog I’m not going to go into much detail, but all you need to know for this post is that it aggregates all of my feeds among many different web services. For example, the public page updates information from my Twitter accounts, LinkedIn, blogs, Flickr, etc. So anyone could stop by this page and find out what’s going on with me in seconds.

Where MyBlogLog Breaks Down

From a user’s perspective there may be SOME value to a page showing the updates from any particular individual. Honestly, I’m really not that interested in other people’s feeds of bookmarks, profile updates, etc. They could be focusing on what they could do best: SEO.

Take a look at a search result listing for a MyBlogLog account. The description of my listing is:

MyBlogLog respects your privacy—we only aggregate publicly-available information . If you wish to edit your list of services, visit the ‘Services’ tab.”

That helps no one! Searches don’t need to see that. Instead, why can’t they populate the description with something about…ME?!

So all of those sites I spent the time entering into MyBlogLog are getting their updates displayed on my home page, but what they aren’t getting is crawled. The news feed containing all of the great information about me (which is the point of the page) isn’t being utilized as efficiently as possible because the content is generated via javascript, and therefore isn’t scannable.

I think it’d be amazing if they could switch that over from a javascript feed to a pure HTML feed.

In All Fairness

MyBlogLog may not have had SEO in mind when building this page. They may seem to think that people are actually interested in viewing all of the updates about myself. They may also want to prevent their site from becoming a spam monster. Understandable.

They do have some follow links on the page that go to all of my services; they’re just without all of the awesome anchor text that I’d like and instead use the name of the service and my username (i.e. Technorati: patrickdaly, etc.).

Conclusion

If MyBlogLog corrected these things it would be a powerhouse of link juice.

Does anyone know of a MyBlogLog alternative that meets these requirements:

  • Public Pages
  • Follow Links (preferably custom anchor text)
  • Already performs well in search engines
  • Free (preferably)

Microsoft’s Failure at Owning Their Keywords

TechCrunch posted earlier today on the irony of Apple owning the first two results for the Google search “i’m a pc”.

This is a lesson to be learned. Own your own brand, your products, and even those of your competitors in the search engines.

Microsoft could have easily created a site dedicated to the idea of “I’m a PC” and used it to counter the advertising of Apple. Unfortunately, they’re just now getting started in their fight back and are struggling to capture the awe of the viewers.

What Percentage of the SERPs Do You Own?

Just recently I’ve been putting a little bit of effort into developing my online reputation.

http://www.google.com/search?q=patrick+daly

A Google search for Patrick Daly (at least from Dallas, TX) shows that I own 70% of the top 10 results. The other three results are a MySpace page, a .gov site, and a biography of another Patrick Daly.

How much do you own?

Proof Your Online Reputation Matters, Employers Deny Applicants

CareerBuilder.com recently survey 31,000 employers and found that 1/3 of them have rejected an applicant because of poor reputation management.

  • Information about alcohol or drug use (41% of managers said this was a top concern)
  • Inappropriate photos or information posted on a candidate’s page (40%)
  • Poor communication skills (29%)
  • Bad-mouthing of former employers or fellow employees (28%)
  • Inaccurate qualifications (27%)
  • Unprofessional screen names (22%)
  • Notes showing links to criminal behavior (21%)
  • Confidential information about past employers (19%)

The study did find that 24% of hiring managers found content on social networks that helped convince them to hire a candidate. Hiring managers said that profiles showing a professional image and solid references can boost a candidate’s chances for a job.

Computerworld Article